Difference between revisions of "Talk:Playroom"

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(Created page with "As the playroom expands, we may want to place the various toys each in their own room. But for now, I think it is OK to have them scattered about in one place here. ~~~~")
 
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As the playroom expands, we may want to place the various toys each in their own room. But for now, I think it is OK to have them scattered about in one place here. [[User:Jdh|JDH]] 12:06, 5 January 2012 (PST)
 
As the playroom expands, we may want to place the various toys each in their own room. But for now, I think it is OK to have them scattered about in one place here. [[User:Jdh|JDH]] 12:06, 5 January 2012 (PST)
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I don't think the Library of Babel belongs in the playroom. There is some discussion of infinity in that story, but the Library of itself contains no more than 26^1,312,000 unique books which is strictly finite. (The narrator only speculates that the library might be infinite and periodic.) Jorge Luis Borges, the author of that story, deals extensively with the notion of infinity in many of his writings and was directly influenced by Cantor's ideas. I think Borges should get his own section in the playroom or his own article in this encyclopedia where individual stories (Library of Babel, The Books of Sand, The Aleph, etc.), poems and simulacra can be discussed.--[[User:AmichaiLevy|AmichaiLevy]] 08:13, 13 January 2012 (PST)

Revision as of 09:13, 13 January 2012

As the playroom expands, we may want to place the various toys each in their own room. But for now, I think it is OK to have them scattered about in one place here. JDH 12:06, 5 January 2012 (PST)

I don't think the Library of Babel belongs in the playroom. There is some discussion of infinity in that story, but the Library of itself contains no more than 26^1,312,000 unique books which is strictly finite. (The narrator only speculates that the library might be infinite and periodic.) Jorge Luis Borges, the author of that story, deals extensively with the notion of infinity in many of his writings and was directly influenced by Cantor's ideas. I think Borges should get his own section in the playroom or his own article in this encyclopedia where individual stories (Library of Babel, The Books of Sand, The Aleph, etc.), poems and simulacra can be discussed.--AmichaiLevy 08:13, 13 January 2012 (PST)